Decorating For Thanksgiving

Decorating For Thanksgiving

by Mobile Illumination

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With Halloween done and gone, what fun do we have to look forward to in November? Why, Thanksgiving of course! As fall marches on, we’re all eager to bundle up in cozy sweaters, sip hot beverages, and feast upon all the deliciousness that the harvest cooks up. Along with the tasty turkey, savory sides, and sweet pumpkin pies, Thanksgiving brings countless communal events that will surely end in smiles for all. But before we start planning our modern Thanksgiving Day activities, let’s take a moment to reflect upon the humble beginnings of this unique holiday.

Where It Began

The first Thanksgiving feast occurred in 1621 and looked a lot different than the modern celebration we’ve all grown to cherish. To celebrate a successful corn harvest, the pilgrims invited the Wampanoag to join in the festivities. This celebration lasted three days and was a rare moment of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans. Throughout the years, the colonists continued to annually feast upon the harvest’s bounty, all while enjoying the company of those around. In 1863, Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving Day a national holiday that was to be held the last Thursday of each November. Now most Americans can’t imagine the holiday seasons without the tastiest holiday of them all, Turkey Day!

A Los Angeles Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving has evolved a lot since the time of the colonies. Along with an abundant feast with friends and family, the modern holiday brings plentiful volunteer opportunities, communal activities, parades, sports games, TV specials, and more. This plethora of turkey themed fun is especially present in Los Angeles. Volunteer opportunities in the city are easy to stumble upon. For instance, you could volunteer at one of Los Angeles’s many homeless shelters or donate to a local food drive. Check out how you can contribute to Westside Thanksgiving, a program that provides a free sit-down Thanksgiving dinner, as well as other services like haircuts, dental care, and vaccinations. Or if you’re looking for something a bit more active, sign up for one of the city’s charity based Turkey Trots, such as Turkey Trot Los Angeles, Thanksgiving Day Run & Food Drive, Dana Point Turkey Trot, or Burbank Community YMCA Turkey Trot. After you’ve ran and volunteered to your heart’s content, you’ll feel great about sitting back and relaxing at home with family, a hot meal, and some classic Thanksgiving TV specials. For more ideas about how to make the most of your holiday in Los Angeles, visit Time Out Los Angeles.

The Day After Thanksgiving

So you’ve volunteered, spent quality time with loved ones, feasted, and relaxed this Thanksgiving. Now what? In addition to all the Thanksgiving Day events in the city, there are just as many things to do the Day After Thanksgiving. You could continue your relaxation with Thanksgiving leftovers and even more family bonding time. Or if you’re looking for a break from all the savory dishes and sweet pies, take a bike ride or urban hike through the city. And if you’re brave enough, you could always tackle Black Friday to get a head start on your Christmas shopping. Whichever activity you do choose to take on, be sure to keep an eye out for all the freshly installed Christmas décor and lighting. While you’re getting inspired by all the sparkly lights and decorations, start planning your own home’s décor and lighting.

Holiday Décor and Lighting

Of course, here at Mobile Illumination, we know exactly what we’ll get up to the Day After Thanksgiving. After Thanksgiving is when Christmas lighting and décor installation is in full swing, so we’ll be working hard to give you the Christmas lighting and décor of your dreams. If you want to skip decorating your property yourself this year, especially after Thanksgiving dinner, be sure to give Mobile Illumination a call to schedule your professional installation.

Happy Thanksgiving and Happy Holidays!

*Information about the history of Thanksgiving gathered from History.com.